Brain and Cognitive Psychopathology

Brain and Cognitive Psychopathology

The human brain has evolved systems to handle complex social cognitive problems. Failure in these systems results in misperception of the social environment and failure to adapt to social reality, leading to many classical psychopathologies in psychosis. This program studies the brain cognitive mechanisms behind such failures, consider their interactions with the social environment, and suggest innovative therapeutic approaches. A range of methodologies from neurocognitive science, social science, combining with brain imaging technologies and neurocomputational modeling are utilized in the program.

Current/Developing projects:

  • Formation of delusions
    This is a project to comprehensively study the phenomenology, cognitive and brain mechanism of delusions of reference, the neurobiological mechanisms and clinical implications of this phenomenon.
  • Language and semantic system dysfunction in Psychosis
    This is to study the language and semantic system dysfunctions in patients with psychosis. Innovative assessment tools are developed.
  • Eye gaze social behavior dysfunction
    Gaze perception is one the most important social information, particularly self-directed gaze. This project aims at characterizing this phenomenon in clinical population, evaluating its brain process and its clinical implications.
  • Brain reward system dysfunction in psychosis
    Reward system is critically linked to dopamine neurotransmission which is dysregulated in psychosis. In this regard, investigation of reward learning in psychosis can shed light on the neuro-cognitive and neurobiological mechanisms underlying key symptom domains of schizophrenia especially motivational deficits.
Prof. Eric YH Chen (Lead)
Dr. WC Chang
Dr. Sherry KW Chan
Dr. Edwin HM Lee
Dr. Christy LM Hui
Dr. Simon SY Lui
Dr. YN Suen