Prevention of Psychosis

Prevention of Psychosis

Individuals ascertained as at-risk mental state (ARMS or clinical high-risk) by standardized operational clinical criteria have a markedly elevated rate of developing psychotic disorder (20-30%) over 2 to 3 years. ARMS individuals also exhibit pronounced functional impairment and are associated with high rate of comorbid mood disorders and heighted suicide risk. In order to better characterize clinical course of ARMS individuals, we have conducted a naturalistic 2-year prospective follow-up of 110 ARMS subjects (ARMS100 study). Recently, we have incorporated multi-modal neuroimaging measurement including structural MRI, DTI, resting-state fMRI and proton MRS, alongside clinical, cognitive and functional assessments, into our ongoing ARMS cohort study with an aim to develop a robust biomarker-based prediction model for psychosis transition and illness outcome. In addition, potential role of reinforcement learning in predicting conversion to psychosis from ARMS is under investigation.


Current projects:
  1. ARMS100 study: a prospective 2-year follow-up of at-risk mental state (ARMS) for psychosis and outcome prediction
  2. A multimodal MRI and proton MRS investigation of at-risk mental state (ARMS) for psychosis
  3. Reinforcement learning impairment in clinical high-risk sample
  4. Learned irrelevance and positive symptoms in clinical high-risk sample
Dr. WC Chang (Lead)
Dr. Edwin HM Lee
Prof. Eric YH Chen
Dr. Sherry KW Chan
Dr. Christy LM Hui