Psychotic Disorders Research (PSI)

Psychotic Disorders Research (PSI)

Psychotic Disorders is a group of condition associated with the failure in brain systems that normally assist us in constructing our ideas of what is “real” around us. This failure particularly affects our perception and interpretation of social reality, reflecting the brain system that might be selectively affected. In some conditions such as schizophrenia, there is a more widespread effect on cognitive systems involved in planning, motivation, and emotional regulation. Psychotic disorders are difficult conditions for the patients and families and are associated with heavy stigma. Delays in help-seeking are considerable. Population-specific factors may affect the presentation and outcome of psychosis. Skillful integration of biomedical and psychosocial skills and integrated teamwork over a longer period of time are often necessary for achieving the best outcomes. Early Intervention programs for psychosis seek to reduce delay, prevent full-blown development of illness, as well as focused specialized treatment in the initial years following first diagnosis. We explore the genetic and early developmental aspects of psychosis in collaboration with the genome research center, the behavioural neuroscience program, as well as epidemiological studies to identify population specific factors for psychosis in Hong Kong. We study the first presentation, treatment delay, pathway to care, and public awareness strategies. We explore in depth the brain and cognitive mechanisms underlying psychotic symptoms, as well as their evolution and responses to treatment. We study the effectiveness of early intervention program in Hong Kong as a whole, as well as explore innovative treatment components, both in biomedical and psychosocial therapies.

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Prof. Eric YH Chen (Lead)
Dr. WC Chang
Dr. Sherry KW Chan
Dr. Edwin HM Lee
Dr. Christy LM Hui
Dr. Simon SY Lui
Dr. YN Suen